Winchester Day Trip

I’ve lived in England most of life and it was only recently that I went on a day trip to Winchester.

I had driven past Winchester numerous times, yet for some reason never stopped in. So one abnormally sunny afternoon, S and I decided to rectify this by going out to see what there was to explore.

In all honesty, Winchester wasn’t a place I had dreamed about visiting for ages. It was a place that, being 47 minutes away from my house, made it conveniently close, and because I’d never been there before I figured “eh, why not!”. As a result I didn’t plan a single element of the trip.

Which sounds fun and spontaneous and whatnot – but in reality it meant that we arrived with no clue what we should do first.

So we did what we always do – ditched the car and hunted down a place for food.

We ate in a fairly unremarkable pub – (burger for S, fish and chips for me) before deciding that a walk around Winchester would be the best way to spend the afternoon. I was in one of those moods where I didn’t know what I wanted to do. All I knew is that I wanted to be outside and not be surrounded by people. Which was fortunate, because whilst it was sunny it was also hella cold – so there weren’t that many people about.

S suggested that we take a walk and see where we end up. I mean, he could have suggested that I take a long walk off a short bridge because I was being hilariously unfunny, but all I heard was ‘bridge’ so that’s the way I walked.

We ended up along the river Itchen, where we snapped some pictures on the bridge like all good tourists do

Before walking down following the flow of the water.

We strolled slowly alongside the walls, stopping to read each plague as we did so.

We pondered what it would have been like in the area during Roman times. My hometown, Chichester, was a Roman City and so it’s a thought which often crosses my mind as I wonder what used to lay where shops, schools and businesses now stand. What the people did for fun or what their aspirations were.

We discussed the houses whose gardens backed onto the river and how lovely it must be come summertime. We discussed what we’d do to our own garden when we got a place and what type of food we’d serve at the barbecues we’d have on the rare occasions England permit us a warm sunny day.

We discussed how beautiful the buildings were.

Then we stopped, took a photo, and discussed how beautiful they were some more.

Historic buildings are vying for your attention literally everywhere you walk.
Whether it’s through the centre or as you wander through the little lanes, so if you’re into buildings – you’ll dig it.

Winchester has inspired poetry and pilgrimages for longer than most generations of my family have existed and so it’s fitting that the cathedral, one of the world’s longest medieval churches, is where Jane Austen is buried.

Now this is the part where I’d love to say that we went inside Winchester Cathedral and it was like stepping back through centuries of English history, but to be honest present-day England kind of got in the way and ruined it for me. The outside was empty but the inside was filled with people (must of been why our walk was so quiet – this is where everyone was!) – and because I didn’t quite fancy being around massive groups of other humans, we decided to give it a miss and go and find donuts instead.

S.
He just gets me.

On our way back we passed the bronze statue of Alfred the Great, who stands so proudly in the centre.

Well, I say proudly.
How proud can a statue really be?

But as soon as the question entered my mind it was replaced by another… “Where on earth did we park the car”.

Eventually we found it and headed back to Chichester, nipping into a little bakery stand on route home. Unfortunately, the donuts were incredibly disappointing, but my walk around Winchester? That was far from it.

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Have you ever been to Winchester?
If so what was your favourite part? Let me know in the comments!